Cornish Splits

A Cornish split is a type of bread that is made in Cornwall, England. It is a round, flat loaf of bread that is traditionally baked on a griddle. The dough for a Cornish split contains flour, water, salt, and yeast. This recipe makes one large or two small splits. Ingredients 1 packet active dry…

A Cornish split is a type of bread that is made in Cornwall, England. It is a round, flat loaf of bread that is traditionally baked on a griddle. The dough for a Cornish split contains flour, water, salt, and yeast. This recipe makes one large or two small splits.

Ingredients

  • 1 packet active dry yeast (2 teaspoons)
  • 1 1/4 cups lukewarm milk
  • 1 tablespoon white sugar
  • 3-4 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons butter, melted and cooled

Instructions

1. In a small bowl, dissolve the yeast in the milk and add the sugar.

2. In another bowl, sift the flour and salt together and add the cooled melted butter.

3. Add the yeast mixture to the flour mixture, and turn out onto a floured counter and knead until dough is smooth and elastic.

4. Place dough in an oiled bowl, cover with clean towel, let rise in warm draft free place for 45 minutes

5 Turn dough out onto freshly floured board, shape into 9 balls

6 Place dough balls into buttered/floured 9 inch square pan

7 Let them sit covered for another 15 minutes to rise again

8 Preheat oven to 425 degrees F (220 degrees C)

9 Bake for 15-20 minutes until browned/puffed

10 Split open & serve warm

Nutrition Facts

  • Serving size: 1 ball of dough
  • Calories: 150
  • Total fat: 7 g
  • Saturated fat: 4 g
  • Cholesterol: 20 mg
  • Total carbohydrates: 19 g
  • Protein: 3 g
  • Sodium: 140 mg
Cornish Splits

What is the difference between a scone and a split?

A scone is a quick bread made with baking powder or soda. They are dense and not as light and fluffy as a split. A split, on the other hand, is made with yeast to get them to rise. They are lighter and have a slightly sweet taste.

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What is a thunder and lightning scone?

A thunder and lightning scone is a type of cream tea that originates from the West Country. Scones, or Cornish splits, are topped with clotted cream and a generous drizzle of honey, golden syrup or treacle.

What is a split bun?

A split bun is a type of yeast bread that is traditionally made in Devon, England. The dough for a split bun is enriched with milk and eggs, which makes it light and fluffy. It is then kneaded, allowed to rise, and baked until the exterior is golden brown.

Split buns are often filled with jam and cream, making them a delicious treat. They are lighter than scones, so they make a great option if you’re looking for something sweet but not too heavy. Thanks to their light texture, split buns are also perfect for soaking up all the flavors of your favorite jams and creams.

Why are hot dog buns different in New England?

New England-style hot dog buns are a staple of New England’s cuisine. They are split on top rather than along the side, which makes them easier to load with toppings and prepare and serve. The advantage of this style of hot dog bun is that it stands upright, making it easy to hold all the toppings in place.

There are many theories about why New England-style hot dog buns are different from those found elsewhere in America. One theory is that the split on top allows for better airflow, keeping the bun from getting soggy. Another theory is that the split allows the heat to evenly distribute throughout the bun, resulting in a more evenly cooked hot dog.

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What is thunder and lightning scones?

Thunder and lightning scones are a type of cream tea from the West Country. They are made with scones, or Cornish splits, topped with clotted cream and a generous drizzle of honey, golden syrup or treacle.

Thunder and lightning scones are a delicious treat for any occasion.


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